Resources to support conservation decisions at multiple scales

Connect the Connecticut outlines a network of priority areas in the Connecticut River watershed for sustaining fish, wildlife, environmental processes, and associated benefits, such as flood protection and recreation. But more than just a map, it offers a set of data and tools that individuals and communities can use to make informed decisions about conservation, planning, and development in the watershed. These resources provide a broader regional context for decisions at any scale, and include supporting data that can help address questions related to land use and management, such as:

  • Where do important ecosystems and species habitats occur and overlap?
  • Where will climate change and sea level rise place the most stress on the landscape?
  • Where is development most likely to occur in the coming decades?

Connect the Connecticut gives you the tools to answer these questions, and many more, as you evaluate conservation and planning opportunities where you live and work.

This is the best starting place for conservation in the Connecticut River watershed.

Ready to get started?

The Gallery of Science Products below provides an introduction to all of the data and tools, allowing you to browse by category and learn what each one has to offer.

Need help?

Contact us for technical assistance.

To get oriented: 

The Connect the Connecticut Report provides an overview of the landscape conservation design approach, and examples of how different types of users can apply the data and tools from this effort to inform conservation and land-use planning.

To start mapping:

The Connect the Connecticut Gallery on the North Atlantic LCC’s Conservation Planning Atlas (Data Basin) provides a gateway to the free mapping platform where you can access the data, and make maps focusing on specific interests or areas of the watershed.

To dig deeper:

The Designing Sustainable Landscapes Documentation provides technical details about the creation of the landscape conservation design, including information about the modeling approach and all of the datasets used in the project.

Gallery of Science Products

The data and tools are grouped within the five main categories, and then by the subcategories “Terrestrial” and “Aquatic”.

Click on the tabs below to learn what’s in each of the five categories of science products, or simply scroll down to view the entire gallery. We provide a detailed description of each science product, and links to where you can access and download the data.

Core Area Network

Partners’ collective prioritization of high priority (core) areas, connections between them, and methods such as tiering that demonstrate why the entire landscape is necessary to achieve shared goals and objectives based on species and ecosystems.

Supporting Data

Assessments and data used to create the core area network. These assessments provide insight into the importance of and basis for core areas, and may be used separately for continuous representation of key information across the landscape and to to complement the core area network.

Future Change Tools

Tools that provide context for making more strategic decisions in anticipation of future changes related to climate and land use.

Restoration Tools

Tools that can inform efforts to reconnect and enhance connectivity in streams and rivers, as well as between blocks of terrestrial habitat that are separated by roads.

Base Data

Additional GIS layers that can be used as base layers or overlays to facilitate viewing and interpreting the landscape design products.

Core Area Network

Partners’ collective prioritization, based on both species and ecosystems, of high priority (core) areas, connections between them, and tiering or other methods that show that the entire landscape is necessary to achieve goals and objectives.

Terrestrial Core Area Network
snip_eameCores

Grassland cores

Cores for grassland species, represented by Eastern Meadowlark, corresponding to Tiers 1 and 2
Aquatic Core Area Network

Supporting Data

Data and information used to create the terrestrial core area network, inclusive of the core areas and the connectors.

Supporting Terrestrial Data
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Regional conductance

Few to ten km scale measure of ability of plants and animals to move or disperse through a specific location
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Local conductance

One to few km scale measure of ability of plants and animals to move or disperse through a specific location
Supporting Aquatic Data

Restoration

These resources can inform efforts to reconnect and enhance connectivity in streams and rivers as well as between blocks of terrestrial habitat that are separated by roads.

Restoration Tools – Terrestrial
Restoration Tools- Aquatic
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Aquatic buffers

Buffers (zones of influence) around the aquatic cores

Future Change

These tools provide context for making strategic decisions that take into account future change related to climate and land use.

Future Change Data – Terrestrial
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Climate stress

Ecological system-specific measure of impact of climate change on a given system by 2080
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Sea level rise

Likelihood of a site being permanently inundated by sea level rise by 2080
Future Change Data – Aquatic
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Sea level rise

Likelihood of a site being permanently inundated by sea level rise by 2080

Base Data

Additional GIS layers that can be used as base layers or overlays to facilitate viewing and interpreting the landscape design products.

Base Data – Terrestrial
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Hillshade

Hillshade layer for adding texture to solid color maps
roads

Roads

Roads by class
Base Data – Aquatic
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HUC 6 Watershed Boundaries

USGS HUC (Hydrologic Unit Code) 6 subwatersheds. There are two within the CT River watershed.
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HUC 8 watershed boundaries

USGS HUC (Hydrologic Unit Code)-8 subwatersheds. There are 13 within CT River watershed.
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Stream class

Streams by ecological system classification.
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